Wednesday, October 12, 2022

Wi’kipatmu’k Mi’kmawey

October is Mi’kmaq History Month. Visit the CEC library to check out our fiction titles by aboriginal authors.

A Snake Falls to Earth
by Darcie Little Badger    
“Nina is a Lipan girl in our world. She's always felt there was something more out there. She still believes in the old stories. Oli is a cottonmouth kid, from the land of spirits and monsters. Like all cottonmouths, he's been cast from home. He's found a new one on the banks of the bottomless lake. Nina and Oli have no idea the other exists. But a catastrophic event on Earth, and a strange sickness that befalls Oli's best friend, will drive their worlds together in ways they haven't been in centuries. And there are some who will kill to keep them apart.” -WorldCat
Break in Case of Emergency
by Brian Francis
“Life has been a struggle for Toby Goodman. Her mother died by suicide five years ago, and her father left before Toby was born. Now a teenager living on her grandparents' dairy farm, Toby has trouble letting people in. Convinced that she is destined to follow her mother's path, she creates a plan to escape her pain. But with the news that her father is coming home and finally wants to meet her, Toby learns the truth of her parents' story. As her careful plans go awry, Toby must rebuild her life from the ground up.” –WorldCat

Code Talker
by Joseph Bruchac
“Throughout World War II, in the conflict fought against Japan, Navajo code talkers were a crucial part of the U.S. effort, sending messages back and forth in an unbreakable code that used their native language. They braved some of the heaviest fighting of the war, and with their code, they saved countless American lives. Yet their story remained classified for more than twenty years. But now Joseph Bruchac brings their stories to life for young adults through the riveting fictional tale of Ned Begay, a sixteen-year-old Navajo boy who becomes a code talker.” -Amazon
Elatsoe
by Darcie Little Badger    
"Imagine an America very similar to our own. It's got homework, best friends, and pistachio ice cream. There are some differences. This America has been shaped dramatically by the magic, monsters, knowledge, and legends of its peoples. Some of these forces are charmingly everyday; others are not. Seventeen-year-old Elatsoe lives in this slightly stranger America. She can raise the ghosts of dead animals, a skill passed down through her Lipan Apache family. Her beloved cousin has just been murdered, in a town that wants no prying eyes. But she is going to do more than pry. The picture-perfect façade of Willowbee masks gruesome secrets, and she will rely on her wits, skills, and friends to tear off the mask and protect her family.” -Publisher

Five Little Indians: A Novel
by Michelle Good
"Taken from their families when they are very small and sent to a remote, church-run residential school, Kenny, Lucy, Clara, Howie and Maisie are barely out of childhood when they are finally released after years of detention. Alone and without any skills, support or families, the teens find their way to the seedy and foreign world of Downtown Eastside Vancouver, where they cling together, striving to find a place of safety and belonging in a world that doesn't want them. The paths of the five friends cross and crisscross over the decades as they struggle to overcome, or at least forget, the trauma they endured during their years at the Mission.” -WorldCat
Hearts Unbroken
by Cynthia Leitich Smith
When Louise Wolfe's boyfriend mocks Native people in front of her, she dumps him over e-mail. It's her senior year and she'd rather spend her time working on the school newspaper. In no time the paper's staff find themselves with a major story to cover: the school musical director's inclusive approach to casting The Wizard of Oz has been provoking backlash. –Summary
Indian Horse
by Richard Wagamese
“Saul Indian Horse is in trouble, and there seems to be only one way out. As he journeys his way back through his life as a northern Ojibway, from the horrors of residential school to his triumphs on the hockey rink, he must question everything he knows.” -WorldCat
Indians on Vacation: A Novel
by Thomas King
“Inspired by a handful of old postcards sent by Uncle Leroy nearly a hundred years earlier, Bird and Mimi attempt to trace Mimi’s long-lost uncle and the family medicine bundle he took with him to Europe.” -Amazon
Medicine River
by Thomas King
“When Will returns to Medicine River, he thinks he is simply attending his mother's funeral. He doesn't count on Harlen Bigbear and his unique brand of community planning. Harlen tries to sell Will on the idea of returning to Medicine River to open shop as the town's only Native photographer. Somehow, that's exactly what happens. Through Will's gentle and humorous narrative, we come to know Medicine River, a small Albertan town bordering a Blackfoot reserve. And we meet its people….At the centre of it all is Harlen, advising and pestering, annoying and entertaining, gossiping and benevolently interfering in the lives of his friends and neighbours.” -Amazon
Medicine Walk
by Richard Wagamese
”Set in the dramatic landscape of the BC Interior, 16 year-old Franklin Starlight is called to visit his father, Eldon, a man he barely knows. The rare moments they have shared trouble Frank, but, he answers the call, a son's duty to a father. He finds Eldon dying of liver failure after years of heavy drinking. Eldon asks his son to take him into the mountains, so he may be buried in the traditional Ojibway manner.” –WorldCat
Starlight
by Richard Wagamese
"The final novel from Richard Wagamese, the bestselling and beloved author of Indian Horse and Medicine Walk, centers on an abused woman on the run who finds refuge and then redemption on a farm run by an Indigenous man with wounds of his own.” –WorldCat
Strangers
by David A. Robertson
Reckoner; Book One
“When Cole Harper is compelled to return to Wounded Sky First Nation, he finds his community in chaos: a series of shocking murders, a mysterious illness ravaging the residents, and re-emerging questions about Cole's role in the tragedy that drove him away 10 years ago. With the aid of an unhelpful spirit, a disfigured ghost, and his two oldest friends, Cole tries to figure out his purpose, and unravel the mysteries he left behind a decade ago.” -WorldCat

Monsters
by David A. Robertson
Reckoner; Book Two
"Cole Harper is struggling to settle into life in Wounded Sky First Nation. He may have stopped a serial killer but the trouble is far from over. A creature lurks in the shadows of Blackwood Forest, the health clinic is on lockdown by a mysterious organization, and long-held secrets threaten to bubble to the surface. Can Cole learn the truth about his father's death? Why won't Choch give him a straight answer? Where the heck is Jayne? Oh, and high school sucks.” -WorldCat
Ghosts
by David A. Robertson
Reckoner; Book Three
“Cole Harper is dead. Reynold McCabe is alive and free. Mihko Laboratories has reopened the research facility and is working to manufacture and weaponize the virus that previously plagued Wounded Sky. People are dying. The community has been quarantined. And time is running out. What deal did Eva strike with Choch? Who will defeat Reynold and Mihko?” -WorldCat
The Barren Grounds: The Misewa Saga
by David Robertson
Misewa Saga; Book One
“Morgan and Eli, two Indigenous children forced away from their families, are brought together in a foster home in Winnipeg, Manitoba. They each feel disconnected and struggle to fit in -- until they find a secret place, walled off in an unfinished attic bedroom. A portal opens to another reality, Askí, bringing them onto frozen, barren grounds, where they meet Ochek (Fisher). The only hunter supporting his starving community, Misewa, Ochek welcomes the human children, teaching them traditional ways to survive. But as the need for food becomes desperate, they embark on a dangerous mission. Accompanied by Arik, a sassy Squirrel, they try to save Misewa before the icy grip of winter freezes everything.” -WorldCat

The Great Bear: The Misewa Saga
by David Robertson
Misewa Saga; Book Two 
"Back at home after their first adventure in the Barren Grounds, Eli and Morgan each struggle with personal issues--Eli is being bullied at school, and tries to hide it from Morgan, while Morgan has to make an important decision about her birth mother. They turn to the place where they know they can learn the most, and make the journey to Misewa to visit their animal friends. This time they travel back in time and meet a young fisher that might just be their lost friend. But they discover that the village is once again in peril, and they must dig deep within themselves to find the strength to protect their beloved friends.” -WorldCat
The Marrow Thieves
by Cherie Dimaline
"In a future world ravaged by global warming, people have lost the ability to dream, and the dreamlessness has led to widespread madness. The only people still able to dream are North America's indigenous population - and it is their marrow that holds the cure for the rest of the world. But getting the marrow - and dreams - means death for the unwilling donors. Driven to flight, a 15-year-old and his companions struggle for survival, attempt to reunite with loved ones, and take refuge from the ‘recruiters’ who seek them out to bring them to the marrow-stealing 'factories.’” – WorldCat 
Hunting by Stars: A Marrow Thieves Novel
by Cherie Dimaline
“French has been captured by the Recruiters, confined to one of the infamous residential schools, where the government extracts the marrow of Indigenous people in order to steal the ability to dream, and where the captured are programmed to betray others of their kind, something which he discovers has been done to his brother; meanwhile the other survivors, his found family, are hunting for him, determined to rescue him--and French has to decide just how much, and whom, he is willing to sacrifice to survive and be reunited with Rose and the others.” -WorldCat
The Strangers
by Katherena Vermette
“Cedar, Phoenix, and Elsie…. These are the strangers, each haunted in her own way. Between flickering moments of warmth and support, the women diverge and reconnect, fighting to survive in a fractured system that pretends to offer success but expects them to fail. Facing the distinct blade of racism from those they trusted most, they urge one another to move through the darkness, all the while wondering if they'll ever emerge safely on the other side.” -WorldCat
Two Roads
by Joseph Bruchac
"It's 1932, and twelve-year-old Cal Black and his pop have been riding the rails for a year after losing their farm in the Great Depression. Cal likes being a ‘knight of the road’ with Pop, even if they're broke. But then Pop has to go to Washington, D.C.--and Cal can't go with him. So Pop tells Cal something he never knew before: He's a Creek Indian, which means Cal is, too. And Pop has decided to send Cal to Challagi Indian School, a government boarding school for Native Americans in Oklahoma. At Challagi, the other Creek boys quickly take Cal under their wing. Even in the harsh, miserable conditions of the school, Cal begins to learn his people's history and heritage, language, and customs. And most of all, he learns how to find strength in a group of friends who have only one another." -WorldCat

Walking in Two Worlds
by Wab Kinew
“Bugz is caught between two worlds. In the real world, she's a shy and self-conscious Indigenous teen who faces the stresses of teenage angst and life on the Rez. But in the virtual world, her alter ego is not just confident but dominant in a massively multiplayer video game universe. Feng is a teen boy who has been sent from China to live with his aunt, a doctor on the Rez, after his online activity suggests he may be developing extremist sympathies. Meeting each other in real life, as well as in the virtual world, Bugz and Feng immediately relate to each other as outsiders and as avid gamers.” -WorldCat